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Dr. Nick Curry is a chiropractor that is also certified through the highly esteemed Titleist Performance Institute as a medical, fitness, and junior golf wellness professional.  He is the owner of Integrative Health and Sports Performance in Bellbrook and serves at the Team Chiropractor to Wright State and Miami Universities.  To Visit their Website or call 937-848-8500
Starting a Strength Program
Last week we talked about things NOT to do when starting a strength training program.  If you avoid making a lot of those common mistakes then you will probably be on a good path with your program.  So now that you know what not to do, let’s talk about the easiest way to start a basic  strength training program.

Assess, Don’t Guess

You will always hear me say an assessment is the first step when working towards any goal.  Can you start a program without an assessment?  Sure.  But entering into a fitness program without an assessment will possibly lead to a less efficient program or even cause injuries.  Easiest place to start with an assessment is our Level 1 TPI Screen.  Based on those results you may be able to jump right into a program or further assessments, such as our Selective Functional Movement Assessment or our Strength and Power Assessments, may be needed to provide us with more information.

sample_TPI_screen

Focus on Prime Movers

The prime mover exercises are legs, push, and pull.  These 3 motions will produce the greatest bang for the buck.  When we do our strength testing we test how much you can push, how much you can pull, and how much you can split squat.  These are the first 3 tests because if we struggle with those then there isn’t much of a reason to continue on with additional testing.  Pick 1-2 of these exercises as your primary exercises for the workout.

     Legs - Lunge or Split Squat

     Pull - Cable Row

     Push - Cable Chest Press 

Multi-Joint Exercises

Again it’s about efficiency.  Why do 2 or 3 exercises when you can get a similar result with 1?  Focusing on your prime movers should force you into doing a lot of multi-joint exercises.  Single joint exercises, such as bicep curls or knee extensions, are fine if we have some weak areas that we really need to focus on.  However, most of those exercises are not very functional for golf or even normal activities of daily living.  A split squat, for example, is primarily working on hip and knee extension in a functional pattern.  If you are doing an exercise and you find yourself only moving one joint during the movement, ask yourself if that exercise is necessary or how you can turn it into a multi-joint exercise.  Add in 3-6 (depending on volume) additional multi-joint exercises to supplement your primary exercises.

Start and End with Movement

Always begin and end your workouts with a good warm-up and recovery.  Warm-up includes functional movement patterns, foam rolling, and some exercises that get the heart rate up.  Recovery should include some stretching, mobility work, or foam rolling.  Make sure to spend a good amount of time on each.  Ideally you would want to spend about 5-10 minutes for each warm-up and cool down.

Minimum of 2 Days per Week

It really only takes 2 days a week to start making progress.  If you can commit to 3-5+ days per week that is great and you will see results faster, but it's not necessary to start.  Each workout should be around 30-60 minutes.  The most common way to organize the workouts is to either do total body each day or split upper/lower body.  The more days per week you workout the more you would need to have each workout be focused on a specific area.

Sample_Workout_12Sample_Workout_12

Archive 
 
Staring a Strength ProgramStarting a Strength Program Last week we talked about things NOT to do when starting a strength training program. If you avoid making a lot of those common mistakes then you will probably be on a good path with your program. So now that you know what not to do, let’s talk about the easiest way to start a basic strength training program. Assess, Don’t Guess You will always hear me say an assessment is the first step when working towards any goal. Can you start a program without an assessment? Sure. But entering into a fitness program without an a...
What Not to Do when Starting a Golf Fitness ProgramWhat Not to Do when Starting a Golf Fitness Program Guessing, Not Assessing Not assessing your weaknesses and strengths is one of the worst things you can do during a training program. If you are going into a workout without a clear goal for the day, month, or even year then you are not getting the most out of your workouts. There are benefits to exercise for general health but if you really want to improve your golf game then you need to know the areas that need to be worked on. Having a professional take you through a TPI screen is a great place to start. Imprope...
Pull StrengthPull Strength We have spent the last month talking about speed and power production and how to incorporate that into a training program. If you watched the US Open this past weekend, you saw how advantageous strength and power can be. The style of play where you just hit it as far as you can and deal with whatever lie you have hasn’t been very well received by traditional golfers, but we can see that it can clearly be effective. Sure, power is great for hitting the ball farther, but just as important (or more important) was the strength to hit out of that thick rough. Ev...
Elbow-Wrist Release PowerElbow-Wrist Release Power The last power source we like to develop iswrist and elbow power. Wrist releasespeed has been shown to be very important in adding power to the swing. The wrist can actually create power in 3different directions. It can extend,rotate and hinge. The most powerfulgolfers utilize all three planes for speed and power. The elbow can also be used as another link inthe chain of power, and is commonly used by the long drive tour players. To incorporate the elbow link, the playerwill have to bend the elbow at the top of the backswing. This allows th...
Arm Chopping PowerArm Chopping Power The ability to deliver explosive speed withthe arms is one of the most important aspects for power in the golf swing. We call it the Arm-Chopping motion, becausethe arms need to start up over the trail shoulder and explosively fire downacross the body to over the lead hip. Many players tend to eliminate this power source by trying to keep theirarms pinned to their chest during the downswing. This may help improve accuracy but it willdefinitely limit power development. Here are some examples of exercises weincorporate to develop arm-chopping power: χ...
Truck Rotary PowerTrunk Rotary Power The “trunk” refers to the combination of the pelvis and thorax. By monitoring the rotary speeds a player develops in those two body segments we can get a good indicator of what type of power they can ultimately generate in the club. The best way to measure these speeds is by analyzing a kinematic sequence with a 3D motion capture. Not only does the kinematic sequence give us the speeds being produced but it also tells us the order in which they are being utilized during the swing. If that sequence is out of order a lot of power can be lost in...
Vertical Thrust PowerVertical Thrust Power Have you ever noticed that many kids have a large jump during their downswing? The reason is because the jump (vertical thrust) is one of the first power sources developed in kids. The vertical jump is also a technique used by some of the most powerful golfers in the world. Despite vertical thrust power being arguably the greatest source of power it is one that is often neglected by golfers. We utilize some of the following methods to develop strength, speed, and power for vertical thrust: ● Skipping warm-up ●...
Developing Power in the Golf SwingDeveloping Power in the Golf Swing To develop power we first need to understand where power is needed. With any power source, you need to develop strength and speed in all areas. The four power sources that influence the golf game the most are: Vertical Thrust Power Trunk Rotary Power Arm-Chopping Power Elbow-Wrist Release Power Vertical Thrust Power Have you ever noticed that many kids have a large jump during their downswing? The reason you may see a jump is it is one of the first power sources developed in kids. If the other three power sources have not develope...
Low Back PainLow Back Pain Low back pain is the most common injury we see in golfers. It is estimated that more than half of you reading this article will have experienced low back pain that has affected your performance at some point this season. And at least 50% of you have missed 3-6 weeks of participation because of the pain. That is a big deal! The most common cause for low back pain in Tour Pros is overuse. I doubt too many of you are hitting more balls than Touring Pros. The most common cause of LBP in amateurs is mechanics. So here’s the best part, low back pain is very prev...
Golfer's Elbow vs. Tennis ElbowGolfer's Elbow vs. Tennis Elbow When these elbow injuries were being namedGolfer’s and Tennis Elbow there really wasn’t a whole lot of thought put intoit. Golfers actually get Tennis Elbow5-6x more than Golfer’s Elbow. So what’sthe difference? Tennis Elbow (lateralepicondylitis) involves an injury to the extensor muscles (backside of yourforearm and outside of the elbow) and Golfer’s Elbow involves an injury to theflexor muscles (palm side of your forearm and inside of elbow). For a long time these injuries wereconsidered to be “tendinitis&r...
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